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Garth Hill College

Citizenship

The intention of Citizenship Studies at Garth Hill College is for our pupils to acquire a sound knowledge and understanding of how the United Kingdom is governed, its political system and how citizens participate actively in its democratic systems of government. We also strive to develop a sound knowledge and understanding of the role of law and the justice system in our society and how laws are shaped and enforced. Citizenship Studies aims to inspire and raise aspirations in relation to the whole child.

Citizenship Studies aims to develop an interest in, and commitment to, participation in volunteering as well as other forms of responsible activity, that they will take with them into adulthood, that allows them to enhance skills to think critically and debate political questions, to enable them to manage their money on a day-to-day basis, and plan for future financial needs.

Citizenship Studies meets the national curriculum requirements. It supports the government’s requirements for schools to implement the anti-extremist Prevent Duty, which is a legal requirement. The Government recommends Citizenship as a means of achieving this.

It is an ideal tool for exploring British Values, which is also required by the Government. Citizenship education is important in building character and developing important transferable skills, such as communication, initiative, interaction with people and team working. Citizenship also supports the school’s Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural outcomes. Citizenship is the only subject in the national curriculum that teaches about the way democracy, politics, the economy and the law work.

All themes within the Citizenship curriculum, including PSHE topics, are planned in a spiral manner, with topics repeating across years and key stages building greater depth over time.

Subject Leaders

  • Mr G Dawson

Year 7 and 8

Citizenship is taught together with Religious Studies in Years 7 and 8. Within their curriculum time, they consider National Curriculum topics on our society, laws and government, as well as Personal, Social, Health Education (PSHE) and Relationships and Sex Education.

Content

Year 7

  • Living in Our World –
    • Aspirations
    • Resilience
    • Mental health
    • Social media
    • The dangers of drugs
  • Relationships and Sex Education –
    • Friendships & family
    • Love & relationships
    • Puberty & periods
    • Forced marriage & FGM
    • Identity & extremism
  • Financial Education –
    • Budgeting
    • Savings, loans & interest
    • Financial transactions & products
  • Human Rights –
    • Human rights in the UK
    • Privacy and the use of body scanners
    • How rights can conflict with each other
    • Global rights issues: Child Soldiers
    • Comparative global human rights
  • Diversity –
    • Stereotyping
    • The impact of immigration on British society
    • The importance of diversity
    • Asylum seekers and refugees
    • Life in the UK
    • Community cohesion

Year 8

  • Financial Education –
    • Income / expenditure
    • Budgeting / saving
    • Payslips & taxes
  • Living in Our World –
    • Personal safety & first aid
    • Vaping
    • Stereotyping
    • Body image
  • Relationships and Sex Education –
    • Homophobia
    • The risks around online grooming
    • Sexual health
    • Consent
    • The risks around sexting
  • Democracy –
    • What is a country?
    • Systems of Government
    • How we vote in the UK
    • What jobs do MPs do?
    • 2019 general Election
  • Crime –
    • Why do we have laws?
    • What is crime?
    • How do young people get punished?
    • Laws and courts
    • Debates around the age of criminal responsibility

Assessment

Pupils are regularly assessed, with a milestone assessment each half term, as well as smaller assessments at mid-points in the half term. These assessments are marked and awarded aspect bands, with feedback provided for the pupils to reflect upon and use to improve their aspect bands at the next assessment.

At the end of the year, pupils will complete an end of year assessment, which will test how they have developed their knowledge and skills over the course of the academic year.

Home Learning

Home learning is set once a fortnight. It is expected to take approximately thirty minutes to complete.

All tasks will be set on Microsoft Teams, which both pupils and parents can access at home. Home learning tasks will be a range of activities, such as creative pieces, research tasks, reading tasks, online quizzes or essay questions.

How parents and carers can support

  • Encourage your child to ask teachers for help if there are any difficulties;
  • Encourage your child to be observant and take an interest in the world around them. This could include reading local and national newspapers and watching news programmes that frequently include geographical issues;
  • Discuss issues and topics covered in lessons with your child;
  • Check that home learning is being done;
  • Help your child understand key words;
  • Help prepare revision resources and tests to check understanding;
  • Encourage the use of any additional resources for information, for example the library, resources on Teams, wider research.

Reading List

  • Newspapers / news websites

Add assessment framework, schedule and knowledge organisers here.

Assessment Framework - Key Stage 3

Year 9 - Transition Year

Exam Board and Syllabus Code

AQA Citizenship Studies 8100

Content

The GCSE Citizenship Course provides the knowledge, understanding and skills to enable pupils to participate as responsible, active citizens in their local community and wider society. It promotes personal, intellectual and social development enabling students to become more self-confident and responsible both in and beyond the classroom. The subject is divided into four themes:

  1. Life in modern Britain
  2. Rights and responsibilities
  3. Politics and participation
  4. Active citizenship

Exams: 100%

In Year 9, pupils will focus on Life in Modern Britain and Active Citizenship. In addition to this, pupils continue to study a programme of Personal, Social and Health Education including Careers Education, Sex and Relationships and Drugs Education.

Assessment

Pupils will be assessed in four main areas, all of which will be entered/sat at the end of the course in Year 11.

Pupils will be regularly assessed. As Year 9 is a transitionary year from Key Stage 3 into Key Stage 4, pupils will continue to be assessed through aspect bands, at least once a half term. These assessments will generally take the form of practice questions and pieces of extended writing which assess the levels of skills and knowledge acquired against the specification of the course.

Home Learning

Home learning is set once a fortnight. It is expected to take approximately thirty minutes to complete.

All tasks will be set on Microsoft Teams, which both pupils and parents can access at home. Home learning tasks will be a range of activities, such as creative pieces, research tasks, reading tasks, online quizzes or essay questions.

How parents and carers can support

  • Encourage your child to ask teachers for help if there are any difficulties;
  • Encourage your child to be observant and take an interest in the world around them. This could include reading local and national newspapers and watching news programmes that frequently include geographical issues;
  • Discuss issues and topics covered in lessons with your child;
  • Check that home learning is being done;
  • Help your child understand key words;
  • Help prepare revision resources and tests to check understanding;
  • Encourage the use of any additional resources for information, for example the library, resources on Teams, wider research.

Year 10 and 11 Citizenship 

Exam Board and Syllabus Code

AQA Citizenship Studies 8100

Content

The GCSE Citizenship Course provides the knowledge, understanding and skills to enable pupils to participate as responsible, active citizens in their local community and wider society. It promotes personal, intellectual and social development enabling students to become more self-confident and responsible both in and beyond the classroom. The subject is divided into four themes:

  1. Life in modern Britain
  2. Rights and responsibilities
  3. Politics and participation
  4. Active citizenship

Exams: 100%

In Year 10, pupils will focus on Rights and Responsibilities and on Politics and Participation. In Year 11, pupils will undertake their Active Citizenship investigation, exploring and raising awareness on a specific issue in society that they believe to be important. In addition to this throughout Years 10 and 11, pupils continue to study a programme of Personal, Social and Health Education including Careers Education, Sex and Relationships and Drugs Education.

Assessment

Pupils will be assessed in four main areas, all of which will be entered/sat at the end of the course in Year 11.

Pupils will be regularly assessed. These assessments will generally take the form of practice questions and pieces of extended writing which assess the levels of skills and knowledge acquired against the specification of the course.

Home Learning

Home learning is set once a fortnight. It is expected to take approximately thirty minutes to complete.

All tasks will be set on Microsoft Teams, which both pupils and parents can access at home. Home learning tasks will be a range of activities, such as creative pieces, research tasks, reading tasks, online quizzes or essay questions.

How parents and carers can support

  • Encourage your child to ask teachers for help if there are any difficulties;
  • Encourage your child to be observant and take an interest in the world around them. This could include reading local and national newspapers and watching news programmes that frequently include geographical issues;
  • Discuss issues and topics covered in lessons with your child;
  • Check that home learning is being done;
  • Help your child understand key words;
  • Help prepare revision resources and tests to check understanding;
  • Encourage the use of any additional resources for information, for example the library, resources on Teams, wider research.